Backpack LiDAR surveying to prepare for planet exploration in cooperation with NASA

Data captured by a KLS system

Laser scanning technology and expertise are needed in space. In recent American Surveyor article FINESSE Exploration Strategies using High-Resolution LiDAR Surveying LiDAR instruments and surveying techniques are considered integral tools in the future exploration of planets.

Today NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration (FINESSE) program’s exploration strategies are being developed using Tripod and Mobile LiDAR instruments.

Due to the extremely high costs of visiting and exploring objects in space, such as the Moon, Mars and other planets, it is crucial to find the right tools and techniques for collecting high-quality data for research. This can be done by making experiments in comparable places on Earth.

Valuable information with LiDAR

The FINESSE scientists have been exploring the Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve (CRMO) in the Snake River Plain of Idaho. As a part of the cooperation CoE-LaSR research professor Antero Kukko has been performing technology demonstrations using an FGI originating backpack mobile laser scanning system Akhka-R3.

In a lava field environment the Lidar detects details often more precise than 1 cm point distribution revealing even tiny details of the surface. The collected data enables the producing of high-accuracy topographic maps and provides information on terrain roughness and morphology features of the surveyed area.

The Backpack system developed in FGI has proven to be an efficient tool for fast collection of precise information in lava fields. The findings indicate that in similar conditions, i.e. in Mars, terrestrial and mobile laser scanning are good options for collecting data for further analogy and exploration studies.

Read the full article in The American Surveyor

Picture: Antero Kukko

The FINESSE program is a consortium of more than 30 research scientists. Their goal is to generate strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and Phobos & Deimos.

Open position: Tenure track Professor in Disruptive Remote Sensing Technologies (FGI)

The Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI), Department of Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry invites applications for the position of Tenure track Professor in Disruptive Remote Sensing Technologies.

FGI is the coordinating research institute of The Centre of Excellence in Laser Scanning and has one of the best laser scanning and photogrammetry laboratories in the Europe. The Department of Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry offers an excellent opportunity to personal development and cutting edge research.

Main tasks of the Tenure track Professor include leadership of research, carrying out cutting edge research personally, leadership of demanding international and academic projects, acquisition of outside funding alone or in collaboration with other professors and group leaders and performing other expert and academic tasks in the field of disruptive remote sensing technologies.

The applications should be sent at the latest 28 Feb 2019 16:15 o’clock (Finnish Time) to kirjaamo@maanmittauslaitos.fi.

See application details

CoE-LaSR seminar: Laser scanning in forestry – from science to operational applications

Collaboration between researchers from the Department of Forest Sciences (University of Helsinki) and end users from industry, consulting, and governmental organizations, for example, has been one of the main aims when developing forest applications within the Centre of Excellence in Laser Scanning (CoE-LaSR). Department of Forest Sciences organized a seminar for stakeholders to present the latest research and results using laser scanning for precision forestry. The seminar also reached students and other faculty members from the Department of Forest Sciences apart from the researchers of the CoE-LaSR.

Measuring intensity of seedlings of Norway spruce with terrestrial laser scanning. © Centre of Excellence, Samuli Junttila.

 

During the afternoon seminar, recent research related to especially TLS and its application in forest mapping and monitoring were presented. The topics included, among others, identifying dead wood, measuring and modelling tree structure and growth as well as health status and wood quality. Furthermore, presentations included experiences from tree species detection and use of augmented reality for harvester drivers.

Detected dead wood from terrestrial laser scanning data. © Centre of Excellence, Tuomas Yrttimaa.

 

Intriguing discussion between participants and presenters emerged especially towards the end of the seminar which continued with a panel discussion. The panelists represented Natural Resources Institute, the City of Helsinki, Metsähallitus, Tapio, Metsäteho, Stora Enso and Finnish Forestry Center, all utilizing either laser scanning or products based on laser scanning such as forest resource information. The panelists described how they see laser scanning in the field of forestry and forest sciences, and also pointed out where research efforts are still needed. These included improving accuracy of estimates for species-specific forest inventory attributes and tree-size distributions as well as logging recovery. In addition, measuring quality attributes such as branchiness from standing trees was seen as important research topic by forest industry.

Panelists discussing laser scanning and its opportunities in forestry and forest sciences. © Centre of Excellence.
Scroll to top